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An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations(English edition)

Author:Adam Smith

Publication date:2015-10-12

ISBN:1159003500250

Language:English

Abstract:

An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations: Adam Smith started to write An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (aka. The Wealth of Nations) in 1768. In 1773, the book was completed basically. But, Adam Smith spent another 3 years to refine it. In March 177...
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An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations: Adam Smith started to write An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations (aka. The Wealth of Nations) in 1768. In 1773, the book was completed basically. But, Adam Smith spent another 3 years to refine it. In March 1776, he released the first edition. In the same year, The Declaration of Independence was also announced. The Wealth of Nations consists of five volumes, starting from the source of wealth—labor, going down to the powerful tool of increasing production—division of labor; division of labor gives rise to bartering goods, and money functions as a common medium of exchange. Then it talks about the price of commodities, and its components: wages, rent of land and profit of stock.

Book catalogue

  • Cover

    1
  • Información de Copyright

    2
  • AN INQUIRY INTO THE NATURE AND CAUSES OF THE WEALTH OF NATIONS.

    3
  • INTRODUCTION AND PLAN OF THE WORK.

    4
  • BOOK I. OF THE CAUSES OF IMPROVEMENT IN THE PRODUCTIVE POWERS OF LABOUR, AND OF THE ORDER ACCORDING TO WHICH ITS PRODUCE IS NATURALLY DISTRIBUTED AMONG THE DIFFERENT RANKS OF THE PEOPLE.

    5
  • CHAPTER I. OF THE DIVISION OF LABOUR.

    6
  • CHAPTER II. OF THE PRINCIPLE WHICH GIVES OCCASION TO THE DIVISION OF LABOUR.

    7
  • CHAPTER III. THAT THE DIVISION OF LABOUR IS LIMITED BY THE EXTENT OF THE MARKET.

    8
  • CHAPTER IV. OF THE ORIGIN AND USE OF MONEY.

    9
  • CHAPTER V. OF THE REAL AND NOMINAL PRICE OF COMMODITIES, OR OF THEIR PRICE IN LABOUR, AND THEIR PRICE IN MONEY.

    10
  • CHAPTER VI. OF THE COMPONENT PART OF THE PRICE OF COMMODITIES.

    11
  • CHAPTER VII. OF THE NATURAL AND MARKET PRICE OF COMMODITIES.

    12
  • CHAPTER VIII. OF THE WAGES OF LABOUR.

    13
  • CHAPTER IX. OF THE PROFITS OF STOCK.

    14
  • CHAPTER X. OF WAGES AND PROFIT IN THE DIFFERENT EMPLOYMENTS OF LABOUR AND STOCK.

    15
  • PART I. Inequalities arising from the nature of the employments themselves.

    16
  • PART II.—Inequalities occasioned by the Policy of Europe.

    17
  • CHAPTER XI. OF THE RENT OF LAND.

    18
  • PART I.—Of the Produce of Land which always affords Rent.

    19
  • PART II.—Of the Produce of Land, which sometimes does, and sometimes does not, afford Rent.

    20
  • PART III.—Of the variations in the Proportion between the respective Values of that sort of Produce which always affords Rent, and of that which sometimes does, and sometimes does not, afford Rent.

    21
  • Conclusion of the Digression concerning the Variations in the Value of Silver.

    22
  • Conclusion of the Chapter.

    23
  • BOOK II. OF THE NATURE, ACCUMULATION, AND EMPLOYMENT OF STOCK.

    24
  • INTRODUCTION.

    25
  • CHAPTER I. OF THE DIVISION OF STOCK.

    26
  • CHAPTER II. OF MONEY, CONSIDERED AS A PARTICULAR BRANCH OF THE GENERAL STOCK OF THE SOCIETY, OR OF THE EXPENSE OF MAINTAINING THE NATIONAL CAPITAL.

    27
  • CHAPTER III. OF THE ACCUMULATION OF CAPITAL, OR OF PRODUCTIVE AND UNPRODUCTIVE LABOUR.

    28
  • CHAPTER IV. OF STOCK LENT AT INTEREST.

    29
  • CHAPTER V. OF THE DIFFERENT EMPLOYMENTS OF CAPITALS.

    30
  • BOOK III. OF THE DIFFERENT PROGRESS OF OPULENCE IN DIFFERENT NATIONS

    31
  • CHAPTER I. OF THE NATURAL PROGRESS OF OPULENCE.

    32
  • CHAPTER II. OF THE DISCOURAGEMENT OF AGRICULTURE IN THE ANCIENT STATE OF EUROPE, AFTER THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE.

    33
  • CHAPTER III. OF THE RISE AND PROGRESS OF CITIES AND TOWNS, AFTER THE FALL OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE.

    34
  • CHAPTER IV. HOW THE COMMERCE OF TOWNS CONTRIBUTED TO THE IMPROVEMENT OF THE COUNTRY.

    35
  • BOOK IV. OF SYSTEMS OF POLITICAL ECONOMY.

    36
  • CHAPTER I. OF THE PRINCIPLE OF THE COMMERCIAL OR MERCANTILE SYSTEM.

    37
  • CHAPTER II. OF RESTRAINTS UPON IMPORTATION FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES OF SUCH GOODS AS CAN BE PRODUCED AT HOME.

    38
  • CHAPTER III. OF THE EXTRAORDINARY RESTRAINTS UPON THE IMPORTATION OF GOODS OF ALMOST ALL KINDS, FROM THOSE COUNTRIES WITH WHICH THE BALANCE IS SUPPOSED TO BE DISADVANTAGEOUS.

    39
  • Part I—Of the Unreasonableness of those Restraints, even upon the Principles of the Commercial System.

    40
  • PART II.—Of the Unreasonableness of those extraordinary Restraints, upon other Principles.

    41
  • CHAPTER IV. OF DRAWBACKS.

    42
  • CHAPTER V. OF BOUNTIES.

    43
  • CHAPTER VI. OF TREATIES OF COMMERCE.

    44
  • CHAPTER VII. OF COLONIES.

    45
  • PART I. Of the Motives for Establishing New Colonies.

    46
  • PART II. Causes of the Prosperity of New Colonies.

    47
  • PART III. Of the Advantages which Europe has derived From the Discovery of America, and from that of a Passage to the East Indies by the Cape of Good Hope.

    48
  • CHAPTER VIII. CONCLUSION OF THE MERCANTILE SYSTEM.

    49
  • CHAPTER IX. OF THE AGRICULTURAL SYSTEMS, OR OF THOSE SYSTEMS OF POLITICAL ECONOMY WHICH REPRESENT THE PRODUCE OF LAND, AS EITHER THE SOLE OR THE PRINCIPAL SOURCE OF THE REVENUE AND WEALTH OF EVERY COUNTRY.

    50
  • APPENDIX TO BOOK IV

    51
  • BOOK V.

    52
  • CHAPTER I. OF THE EXPENSES OF THE SOVEREIGN OR COMMONWEALTH.

    53
  • PART I. Of the Expense of Defence.

    54
  • PART II. Of the Expense of Justice

    55
  • PART III. Of the Expense of public Works and public Institutions.

    56
  • PART IV. Of the Expense of supporting the Dignity of the Sovereign.

    57
  • CONCLUSION.

    58
  • CHAPTER II. OF THE SOURCES OF THE GENERAL OR PUBLIC REVENUE OF THE SOCIETY.

    59
  • PART I. Of the Funds, or Sources, of Revenue, which may peculiarly belong to the Sovereign or Commonwealth.

    60
  • PART II. Of Taxes.

    61
  • APPENDIX TO ARTICLES I. AND II.—Taxes upon the Capital Value of Lands, Houses, and Stock.

    62
  • CHAPTER III. OF PUBLIC DEBTS.

    63

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